Tag Archives: Anne Tyler

“You need to develop some social skills. Some tact, some restraint, some diplomacy.”

To mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Hogarth commissioned “today’s best-loved novelists” to retell “the world’s favourite playwright’s” dramas.  Anne Tyler’s novel Vinegar Girl is based on “The Taming of the Shrew,” a play that Tyler said she hated … Continue reading

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“It was as if nothing I’d ever done in my life prior to this counted.”

The wonderful thing about 600-page sagas is, in my view, the opportunity to develop a wide perspective. Readers get to see the consequences of decisions as they play out over the span of decades. Sometimes characters come to see things … Continue reading

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“But, like most families, they imagined they were special.”

What makes this family special? Anne Tyler provides this list: They thought their uncanny ability to keep their dogs alive for eons set them apart, as did their fierce disapproval of any adults who wear jeans, and their air of … Continue reading

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“The strangest thing about my wife’s return from the dead was how other people reacted.”

Oh, how I love an unreliable narrator! Our quote is the first sentence of the novel, and it’s clearly a flat-out lie. (The strangest thing about anyone’s return from the dead is that it happened — of course people thought … Continue reading

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