Tag Archives: Pulitzer Prize

“Until recently, we simply didn’t know how immense this problem was, or how serious the consequences, unless we had suffered them ourselves.”

When Matthew Desmond was growing up, money was tight.  Sometimes the gas got shut off, and his parents eventually lost their home to foreclosure. This week, he won the Pulitzer Prize for his nonfiction book Evicted, which is about eight … Continue reading

Posted in non-fiction | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

“A writer’s goal is to light up the sky.”

As a fan of Pulitzer-Prize winning poet Ted Kooser, I couldn’t wait to see what he would say about using metaphors in this little-known book for people who want to start writing.  He writes, “. . .  an apt metaphor … Continue reading

Posted in non-fiction | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

“Can you taste what I’m saying?”

The poem continues: “It is onions and potatoes . . . it is obvious. . .” This is how Philip Levin conceptualizes truth in the poem “The Simple Truth.” I’m often reminded of this gritty, elegant poem when I scrub … Continue reading

Posted in poetry | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

“We understand ourselves, our lives, retrospectively.”

This is an interesting statement, considering it’s from someone who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1992 for her column “Public and Private,” in which she explored different ways to understand her life and the world at large in the heat … Continue reading

Posted in memoir | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Tonight the windows hold all light inside: they fold it back on walls…

. . . and spill gold over things that tell us who we are.”  This is from “Learning the Language”  by Henry Taylor. It’s a beautifully constructed poem that follows strict rules of rhyme and meter. When he won the Pulitzer Prize … Continue reading

Posted in poetry | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

“We can’t chose what we want and what we don’t want and that’s the hard lonely truth.”

At 771 pages, this is a long novel.  Is it worth it?  Many of the 57 commentators on the Kirkus review didn’t think so.  However, I love the way Tartt develops big themes.  And she has sentences that are works of … Continue reading

Posted in fiction | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Some part of art is the art of waiting”

The poet Ted Kooser — who won the Pulitzer Prize after he retired — knows something about art and waiting. However, that doesn’t mean he’s a calm poet. His poem “Memory” starts like this: “Spinning up dust and cornhusks as it crossed the … Continue reading

Posted in poetry | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

“They could tell it was Jun Do who’d picked which orphans ate first and which were left with watery spoonfuls.”

When Jun Do was a child living in an orphanage in North Korea, one of his responsibilities was to decide which of his peers would be punished.  That was just the beginning. As an adult, he was often in the impossible position of trying to let the … Continue reading

Posted in fiction | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment